Smudge

The owners of one of our rescue dogs have been in touch to say that their dog Smudge has recently passed away.

Please see below for his epitaph from his owners.

We would like to inform you that our beloved rescue Springer smudge has sadly passed away at the grand old age of 17.

We had 10 lovely yrs with her since she came to us in August 2006.

Smudge has been a great companion to our 4 grandsons and loved visits to out caravan in Singleton. When she was younger she was energetic and very playful but in the past few years has found it more and more difficult to get about.

We will all miss her dearly. Our son and daughter in law are in the process of re-homing a rescue springer from yourselves and we look AAforward to being Springer grandparents very soon ( We would love this to be posted on your website)

G and C Bingham, St Helens

‘Rescue Me’ Book by one of our rescue dog owners. All Profits go to Nwessr

RESCUE ME

by Laurie Dyer

Laurie is the proud owner of an NWESSR dog called Dolly, and she is the inspiration behind a book which he has written. It is mainly a work of fiction, with occasional reference to personal experiences thrown in for good measure.

Join Dolly on her adventurous exploits and missions. The insight into a dog’s world will surprise and amuse you. We often say if only they could speak.

Well, maybe they can…

The book features fantastic comical illustrations throughout by the very talented James Dyer.

Laurie will be launching the book at NWESSR Fun Day on Sunday 25th June 2017, so come along and meet both him and Dolly.

Laurie is very kindly donating all the proceeds after printing costs to NWESSR.

To order email [email protected]
remember to include name, address,  and tel no. allow 3 weeks delivery

Cost of the book is £7.00 plus £2 p&p Payment can be made by Bacs account no 74531027 Sort code 40-47-84

Jazz

Arrow
Arrow
ArrowArrow
Slider

 

The owners of one of our rescue dogs have been in touch to inform us of his recent passing:(

Please see below for some words from his owners.

We got Max and Jazz, brother and sister, from the NWESSR in June  2010.

They were just turning seven they couldn’t wait to get in the car! We were told to feed Jazz separate else she would pinch Max’s food, on the one hand, she was very protective of him on the other she hogged all the toys and would hover to lick his bowl!

When Jazz first arrived she was stress incontinent and kept hiding behind her bed under the TV stand. Both of them had a bad start in life and though they had been rehomed before coming to us they had regressed. With the help and advice from NWESSR, we got through and Jazz became an affectionate and happy dog.

She loved her cuddly toys and she loved going out in the car going for paddles all the things spaniels love! In June 2016 Jazz was diagnosed with a 70% mass which turned out to be a tumor she fought a brave battle but in May 2017 she was fading fast. we took her on the Leighton Buzzard Steam Railway in her last week as a goodbye.

On Saturday we had to take her to the Vet we had her put to sleep and she went in my arms. Missing her so much heartbroken. 

 

 

JAZZ JUNE 10th 2003 – May 27th 2017

A Chesterton

Pspo orders and how they jeopardise the future of walking your dog in public places

IF YOU ENJOY EXERCISING YOUR DOG OFF LEAD IN PUBLIC PLACES

YOU NEED TO READ THIS

As well as bylaws and Dog control orders, did you know that Local authorities in England, Wales and Northern Ireland can introduce Public Spaces Protection Orders to impose blanket restrictions on where dog walkers can go with their dog and whether they can let their dogs off lead.

For example, these restrictions may specify a particular park (or area within the park) where dogs must be kept on a lead at all times, or ban dogs from a beach for specific times of the year or even all year round.

It does seem that dogs and their owners are being continually hounded. There are always people in the media, on the local council or residents association, who would seem to favour a  ban on dogs full stop. It is the time that responsible owners made themselves heard before opponents get their wish.

Since the introduction of the Animal Welfare Act 2006 there is a legal requirement for those responsible for dogs to provide them with ‘suitable exercise’, which means regular opportunities to walk and run off the lead.

Whilst the public have sympathy and quite rightly, for wild animals who are prevented from exhibiting their natural behaviour, the same sympathy from some is not extended to dogs.

The majority of dog walkers are responsible, but there is an irresponsible minority who don’t pick up after their dog or allow their dogs to run out of control. This has resulted in an increasing number of local authorities introducing ever more stringent restrictions on where all dog walkers can exercise their dogs.

Whilst some restrictions may be sensible many others do not meet these criteria and are unreasonably causing hardship for responsible dog owners – in many cases making it harder for dog owners to provide appropriate exercise for their dogs.

Concerns have been growing through the dog owning public following recent changes to the law, which it is believed have increased the chances of unreasonable restrictions being implemented.

Currently, in England and Wales, there are three main pieces of legislation which may restrict dog access in public spaces. In particular the Public Spaces Protection Orders (PSPOs) (introduced under the Anti‑social Behaviour, Crime and Policing Act 2014 to repeal and replace Dog Control Orders by October 2017). This legislation is now out for consultation and it is time for responsible dog owners to stand up for their rights and more importantly the rights of their dog.

PSPOs were designed to be used to tackle individuals or groups committing any form of anti-social behaviour in public spaces – including dog owners. To implement a PSPO, the local authority must be satisfied on reasonable grounds that the activity has been or is likely to be detrimental to the quality of life of those in the locality, and that the activity is likely to be persistent and unreasonable in nature. The PSPO can either prohibit the activity or make specific requirements`on those who are carrying out the detrimental activity. As such they can be used for a very broad range of activities; e.g tackle the use and sale of ‘legal highs’, street racing, busking, use of remote controlled model vehicles and of course, dog walking. The Act repealed the ability for local authorities to implement new DCOs which means that primary authorities (district/county councils) seeking to introduce new dog control measures must now use PSPOs, with existing DCOs being converted into PSPOs in October 2017. Whereas DCOs were very prescriptive, PSPOs provide local authorities with considerable flexibility on the restrictions they seek to introduce and the process that they are required to follow to do so. Whilst the Government provided clear instructions to local authorities that they must provide

The Act repealed the ability for local authorities to implement new DCOs which means that primary authorities (district/county councils) seeking to introduce new dog control measures must now use PSPOs, with existing DCOs being converted into PSPOs in October 2017. Whereas DCOs were very prescriptive, PSPOs provide local authorities with considerable flexibility on the restrictions they seek to introduce and the process that they are required to follow to do so. Whilst the Government provided clear instructions to local authorities that they must provide

The PSPO can either prohibit the activity or make specific requirements`on those who are carrying out the detrimental activity. As such they can be used for a very broad range of activities; e.g tackle the use and sale of ‘legal highs’, street racing, busking, use of remote controlled model vehicles and of course, dog walking. The Act repealed the ability for local authorities to implement new DCOs which means that primary authorities (district/county councils) seeking to introduce new dog control measures must now use PSPOs, with existing DCOs being converted into PSPOs in October 2017. Whereas DCOs were very prescriptive, PSPOs provide local authorities with considerable flexibility on the restrictions they seek to introduce and the process that they are required to follow to do so. Whilst the Government provided clear instructions to local authorities that they must provide

Whereas DCOs were very prescriptive, PSPOs provide local authorities with considerable flexibility on the restrictions they seek to introduce and the process that they are required to follow to do so. Whilst the Government provided clear instructions to local authorities that they must provide

Whereas DCOs were very prescriptive, PSPOs provide local authorities with considerable flexibility on the restrictions they seek to introduce and the process that they are required to follow to do so. Whilst the Government provided clear instructions to local authorities that they must provide restriction-free sites for dog walkers to exercise their dogs. It is still open to interpretation. We know local authorities and dog walkers do not always have the same idea as to what is suitable.

.
NWESSR was contacted by a dog owner who is concerned about proposed restrictions in the Fylde area. Apart from fighting this locally, he set up an online petition calling for the government to ban all existing & proposed PSPOs affecting the quality of life for dogs and their owners.

While the KC recognise at times there is a need for restrictions, they know that many which come into force are not justified, proportionate or appropriate to deal with the underlying problems they seek to address. In some cases, they suspect it may even exacerbate them.

To keep things in perspective. There are approximately 8.5–9.3 million dogs in the UK, with the majority being walked off-lead at least once a day, this equates to over 3 billion dog walks per year. While it is difficult to put figures on levels of anti-social behaviour related to dogs, the KC confidently say the overwhelming majority of dog walks take place without incident. Similarly, data collected by Keep Britain Tidy report that levels of dog fouling have consistently declined over the past 10 years.

While it is difficult to put figures on levels of anti-social behaviour related to dogs, the KC confidently say the overwhelming majority of dog walks take place without incident. Similarly, data collected by Keep Britain Tidy report that levels of dog fouling have consistently declined over the past 10 years.

The Anti-social Behaviour, Crime and Policing Act 2014 allows local authorities greater freedom to introduce dog-related offences, some of which are more ‘creative’ in their nature than others. There are a number of proposals to introduce novel

There are a number of proposals to introduce novel dog-related offences which could not have been introduced under older legislation.

DNA REGISTERS
There has been some high profile media coverage over the potential use of DNA technology to trace those responsible for leaving dog waste behind. Whilst the theory of being able to track those responsible for not picking up may sound appealing to local authorities, the KC is extremely concerned about how necessary and practical this actually is, particularly considering the high costs involved.

MEANS TO PICK UP
A number of local authorities implement a so-called means to pick up’ requirement. Put simply, it provides the ability for local authority enforcement officers to require a dog walker to prove they have a receptacle to pick up after their dog.

While many local authorities are implementing restrictions in a fair and sensible manner, a significant number are not. In most cases, the Kennel Club and local dog walkers have been successful in getting local authorities to amend the most restrictive proposals. However, in all likelihood, it will only be a matter of time before a combination of excessively restrictive proposals and poor consultation practices will result in a PSPO being introduced which will have significant negative impacts on both dog owners and their dogs.

Even in the less extreme cases, PSPOs are causing considerable hardship and distress for local dog owners. The Kennel Club have produced a comprehensive report and believe the recommendations that they have identified would reduce the risk of this, without hindering local authorities from dealing with problems related to irresponsible dog walkers.
To read the full report go to www.kcdog.co.uk

It is important that dog owners stay vigilant in their area for any proposed restrictions. By law, a consultation must take place prior to implementation. Check out local newspapers, council websites and watch for signs going up informing the public of proposals. Spread the word amongst the dog owning community. You

Check out local newspapers, council websites and watch for signs going up informing the public of proposals.

Spread the word amongst the dog owning community. You will, of course, need to contact your council. Don’t worry help is at hand. The Kennel Club is the only organisation which monitors and responds to individual PSPO proposals to restrict dog access across England and Wales. Contact them and they will provide assistance and advice in your dealings with the

Don’t worry help is at hand. The Kennel Club is the only organisation which monitors and responds to individual PSPO proposals to restrict dog access across England and Wales. Contact them and they will provide assistance and advice in your dealings with the Council

www.kcdog.org.uk

Maddie

Arrow
Arrow
Slider

Please say hello to Maddie, to our latest Rescue Tails recruit.

“It was a strange Sunday when I came to my new home. I went on a walk with my new family and then a long car journey, but as I love the car, I just went with the flow.

The new home is in Lincolnshire and it comes complete with another NWESSR rescue dog called Toby. He’s a bit mad, chases shadows etc. and he mostly ignored me at the beginning, but I think he likes me now, and we have played together a bit. I’ve taken over all his tennis balls, and he has taken possession of my toys, but I like the balls best so it’s a good compromise.

I have really got my paws firmly under the table, I have been to my new vets for a check-up and seen the diabetic nurse specialist. They are all very happy with my progress, my teeth need some attention though, so my new Mum has been brushing them every day, I don’t mind, in fact I like the taste of the toothpaste!

Mum says I am a bit of a “Chunky Monkey”, but since I got here I have lost nearly 2Kgs, nothing to do with my food or injections, just lots of exercise, 3 short walks in the beautiful Lincolnshire Countryside a day. I was a bit wary at first, but now I love running with Toby in the Rape fields and woods, having competitions to see who can put the most Partridges or Pheasants up!

I have also had a haircut too and am now looking short and chique! Also had my pet passport (didn’t know you could get those), done ready for the Summer. Toby tells me we have a new caravan, so in June we will be at the Funday, and in August we are going to France and Spain for 3 weeks.

Last Sunday we went over to Nottingham to meet the rest of the family, Granny and Grompa, and the doggy cousins Rosie, Lily and Hector. We went to Gedling country park and I proved I am a proper Springer and love swimming. Hector took rather a shine to me, can’t blame him as I am pretty,  but please, he’s a Pug!!! Ugly but cute too.

Here is a photo of me chill-laxing with Toby. I’ll update you all soon. Woof Woof. Maddie. XXX

Seeking Forever Loving Homes for Rescue Special Springers