Bailey

Bailey is 1yr 10 months, the first year of his life was fine and he was happy. But then his world was turned upside down when a baby arrived. At this crucial stage in his life, he now had to compete for attention and his owners no longer had the time to train and exercise him. Understandably Bailey was unhappy with this new situation and struggled to make sense of it. Bailey was left with friends for a week or so, to give the new parents space. Shortly afterwards he was neutered for medical reasons, due to an undescended testicle. All these changes really unsettled poor Bailey. Having been house trained, at around this point, he seemed to be anxious  and started urinating in the house.  While this behaviour is less pronounced now, when confronted with new people in the home, who make him scared, he can wee. To get attention, even if that might be negative, he started to take things he should not have, particularly things related to the baby, i.e a sock or the baby’s toys. He could be stubborn, when he didn’t want to give then up, but as he is food/treat motivated they can be used as a swop. In a new situation recently, Bailey was getting excitable and seeking attention, he grabbed at clothes and on one occasion caused bruising. Bailey would prefer new owners who are around a lot, as he was been left for 6 hours which is not acceptable and sometimes showed his dismay by being destructive. Bailey needs to feel part of the pack, so it would be preferable not to shut him in a room behind a solid door, but instead use a baby gate if necessary. He is quite alert to noises and will bark. Bailey would benefit from being completely ignored if he does this and rewarded with a “good boy”, whenever he is quiet, so that he realises what action gets him the preferred attention.

Bailey  has not lived with a dog but has stayed with an older terrier bitch  with whom he got on fine. Outside of the home he generally likes other dogs though he can be  wary of bigger dogs, especially black labs having been attacked on one occasion. He has lived happily with a young cat who was in the home just before he arrived. He seems not bothered by or interested in birds  or livestock.

Like many young springers, Bailey pulls on the lead, especially at the start of a walk, so a new owner will need to work on this. Off lead his recall is quite good and while he runs ahead, he generally checks back when called. A new owner will need to continue to establish this.

Bailey is an affectionate boy. He needs an active but quiet, child free home, with understanding owners, who will have time to give him lots of attention and exercise and earn his trust. It is likely he could live with a dog/cat.

Bailey has missed out on so much so far. Not surprisingly, emotionally he is not as old as stated officially. A sympathetic owner willing to help him rebuild his confidence, will reap the benefits of a great companion for years to come and with the knowledge they have changed Bailey’s life for the better.